POLL: “Most direct primary care (DPC) doctors consider themselves “concierge” doctors too. What are you??”

Like it, hate it or simply indifferent to it, the term appeared in headlines and stories over 106,450 times alone in 2013. Across America, the power of the media (liberal, conservative and otherwise) have adopted and crowned their winning term as “concierge medicine.”

By Michael Tetreault, Editor

FEBRUARY 28, 2014 – This topic is a big deal. The subject elicits an animated response, and everyone has an opinion on what it should and shouldn’t be called. And rightly so. Seeing both sides of the industry as we do with our publications and national media citations, it’s a little known fact that most direct primary care (DPC) doctors consider themselves “concierge” doctors as well. No, it’s not easy to understand the difference but there are subtle differences (See definitions below).

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So what do you call yourself? When asked, most physicians consider themselves concierge doctors. Across America, the power of the media has adopted and crowned their winning term as “concierge medicine.” Like it, hate it or simply indifferent to it, the term appeared in headlines and stories over 106,450 times alone in 2013.

branding concierge medicine book
A controversial debate to be sure, but when patients and the media are the ones driving the discussion, you need to understand how your practice can capitalize on this term and benefit from its progression. On Sale Now and at Amazon.com — Only $9.95

The use of the term, controversial and often misunderstood is a brand name and household term that the media (not just us mind you …) has adopted among a wide variety of options such as: boutique medicine; retainer medicine; wealth-care; cash-only medicine, etc. Not to be confused with its familiar cousin, direct primary care (DPC), concierge medicine is a slightly different type of doctors office with different services offered than its often aligned, DPC term. Concierge Medicine in 2014 is now widely understood to be a real healthcare alternative and growing option for the middle-class patient and Mom-types. So, get used to the brand and term … it’s here to stay.

In a story just last month (January 2014), one reporter writes … despite the name “concierge medicine,” local physicians think the model is accessible to those with lower incomes.

branding concierge medicine 2014_LG
Survey Conducted Between April of 2010 to January of 2014 Among 11,000 Respondents. Click On Image To Enlarge.

“The ‘concierge’ term gets people to imply high value, which is good. We want them to feel like they’re coming to a high-quality place,” says Dr. Josh Umbehr of Atlas MD in Wichita, KS. “But it also gets them to assume high cost. That’s OK, though, because I can show you my costs are affordable.”

If you want to be a successful physician in this industry, you better understand the mechanics of each type of business model (i.e. DPC  and concierge medicine) and your market position. Here are some articles and definitions to help you learn more about these business models.

RELATED STORY …

The Difference Between Concierge Medicine and Direct Primary Care

RELATED BUSINESS STORY …

PART 1 of 3: DPC and Concierge Medicine Models: What’s Best For Me?

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